Video

Bently Spang

Culture: 
Primary Medium(s): 

"I am interested in sampling from as many mediums and modes of expression as are necessary to express my experience as a living Cheyenne man. I sit squarely in the center of a continuum of making that is countless generations old. Moving forward with my work, I strive to illuminate the contradictions, the injustices and to celebrate the intricacies of a living culture."

IAIA Vision Project Interview by Catherine Mattes
Interview with Tipi Artist Bently Spang
Bently Spang examines culture with humor in Emerson installation
A Time of Visions: Interview by Larry Abbott
Indian 3.0 An art installation by Mary Black Bonnet, Trevino L. Brings Plenty, Bently Spang. Shown Nov 2007.

Kade Twist

Culture: 
Primary Medium(s): 

Kade L. Twist works with video, installation, sound, text and two-dimensional media. In his words, he aims to "combine re-imagined tribal stories with geopolitical narratives to examine the unresolved tensions between market-driven systems, consumerism and American Indian cultural self-determination that dominate the postcolonial landscape."

http://nativelabs.com/
http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/jackalope/2010/08/_kade_twist.php
IAIA Vision Project Profile by Catherine Mattes
http://postcommodity.com/

Richard Ray Whitman

Culture: 
Primary Medium(s): 

Richard Ray Whitman (born 1949) is a Yuchi-Muscogee Creek multidisciplinary visual artist, poet, and actor. He is enrolled in the Muscogee Creek Nation and lives in Oklahoma.

RICHARD RAY WHITMAN ON INFLUENCES, POLITICS, AND FIRE
I spent some time at Wounded Knee in 1973. That influenced my art and my role as an artist, a culture worker, and a tribal citizen. I had left Santa Fe for Cal Arts and then went to Wounded Knee and never returned to art school. I began to see the artist's role in the context of the struggles at that time, and when I look to Central and South America at the indigenous cultures there, the artist, the poet, the writer, were always in the forefront and part of the larger vision for the people, and, of course, they are the ones who are usually assassinated or who become the political prisoners. I don't see enough artists in North America who are doing the real work that has been assigned them. Rather, the artist seems to do marketable work of safe images to hang on the wall, not work that is engaging and saying something about how it is with us today. So going to Wounded Knee had a very strong impact on my life. It changed my life completely. That experience still sheds light on what I do today.

Nicholas Galanin

Culture: 
Primary Medium(s): 

Culture cannot be contained as it unfolds. My art enters this stream at many different points, looking backwards, looking forwards, generating its own sound and motion. I am inspired by generations of Tlingit creativity and contribute to this wealthy conversation through active curiosity. There is no room in this exploration for the tired prescriptions of the "Indian Art World" and its institutions. Through creating I assert my freedom.

Concepts drive my medium. I draw upon a wide range of indigenous technologies and global materials when exploring an idea. Adaptation and resistance, lies and exaggeration, dreams, memories and poetic views of daily life--these themes recur in my work, taking form through sound, texture, and image. Inert objects spring back to life; kitsch is reclaimed as cultural renewal; dancers merge ritual and rap. I am most comfortable not knowing what form my next idea will take, a boundless creative path of concept-based motion.

John Feodorov

Culture: 
Primary Medium(s): 

My work meanders around meaning and identity and the ways we seek to locate them within our lives. Sometimes this search can seem like an act of desperation—a longing for a Something, an Other, that may or may not exist. I think that my paintings and drawings are a reflection of how I try to balance this subconscious longing within my own life. Intentionally ambiguous and dreamlike, they imply a meaningful narrative that often does not exist outside the mind of the viewer. Ultimately, my hope is that they act as catalysts for critical thinking and meditation. The installations, assemblages and video works on the other hand can be interpreted as failed attempts to resolve the contradictions between a desire for a sense of “authentic” connection with growing global capitalism that promotes and feeds off of social and spiritual alienation.

Subscribe to RSS - Video